Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

Standard Edition

A Weekly Summary of Events and Topics of Interest to Online Genealogists

Vol. 7 No. 47 – November 25, 2002

Search previous issues of this newsletter at: http://www.RootsForum.com

This Plus Edition of the newsletter was sent to ##L@##H. Some of the articles in this newsletter are restricted to your personal use.

Copyright© 2002 by Richard W. Eastman. All rights reserved.


IN THIS ISSUE:

- (+) Thank You Plus Edition Subscribers!

- Pilgrims on the Web

- The First Thanksgiving

- Dell Adds Competition to PocketPC Market

- Public Beta of The Pocket Genealogist 2.50

- Genealogy by Genetics

- America, America: A CD-ROM Gazetteer

- Pathe News Film Archive

- Tracing African-American Ancestry

- Fun Stuff for Genealogists

- (+) Genealogy Database Contributes to Identity Theft?

- The Mysterious Genealogy of Russian President Putin

- Update to Last Week’s "Piece of the Scottish Highlands" Article

- Printing or E-mailing This Newsletter

- (+) A Question About Plus Edition Delivery Format

- Home Pages Highlighted


- (+) Thank You Plus Edition Subscribers!

  • This article is a Plus Edition-only article. It is copyright 2002 by Richard W. Eastman and is restricted to viewing solely by subscribers to the Plus Edition of this newsletter. Details about the Plus Edition are available at: http://www.RootsForum.com/plus

  • [Return to Table of Contents]


    - Pilgrims on the Web

    This week the United States will celebrate Thanksgiving. This holiday commemorates a day in 1621 when more than 90 Wampanoag Indian men shared food with the 52 English settlers who had survived the first year in their new land. The settlers’ numbers had been cut in half; on the previous November 11, 102 settlers had set foot in what was to be called Plimoth. The remaining Pilgrims certainly must have been thankful to have survived that first harsh year.

    The 1621 celebration lasted a bit longer than our present holiday: it was a three-day harvest celebration. Did you know that the first Thanksgiving was probably celebrated in October? Also, the Pilgrims probably drank beer at that feast, not water. No printed menus of what was served at the first Thanksgiving survive today. However, historians assure us that the Pilgrims’ diet never included the tender butterball turkeys of today surrounded by two varieties of potato, peas, green beans, salads, and cranberry sauce.

    Today there are millions of individuals descended from these brave souls. Many families have traditions that claim descent from one or more of the Mayflower passengers. Not all of these family traditions are accurate, however. Luckily, the first several generations of descendants of the Mayflower passengers have been well researched and documented. In addition, almost every scrap of information about the passengers and their lives has been documented. Much of that information is now appearing on the World Wide Web.

    A modern-day recreation of the Pilgrim’s fist settlement has been created near the original site. Plimoth Plantation is on the outskirts of present-day Plymouth, Massachusetts. A replica of the Mayflower is anchored nearby. If you are able to visit in person, you will see re-enactors who live in much the same manner as the early Pilgrims did. If you cannot visit in person, you can still view the Web site at http://www.plimoth.org. You might also want to look at the pictures at http://www.plimoth.org/TG%20exh/PLP2275_a.htm

    Another huge resource is Caleb Johnson's Mayflower Web Pages. This site includes:

    Caleb Johnson's Mayflower Web Pages site is located at: http://members.aol.com/calebj/mayflower.html.

    The Society of Mayflower Descendants in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Web site also provides a wealth of information. It also serves as an example for other societies to emulate. Look at: http://www.sail1620.

    Finally, the Mayflower Society maintains an excellent online resource at: http://www.mayflower.org.

    To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter message board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Message Board."

    [Return to Table of Contents]


    - The First Thanksgiving

    Where was the first Thanksgiving held in North America? If you guessed Plymouth, Massachusetts, guess again.

    On April 30, 1598, Spanish nobleman Don Juan de Oñate and a group of settlers traveling northward from Zacatecas, Nueva España (now Mexico), reached the banks of El Rio Bravo (Rio Grande). The first recorded act of thanksgiving by colonizing Europeans on this continent occurred on that April day in 1598 in Nuevo Mexico, about 25 miles south of what is now El Paso, Texas.

    After having begun their northward trek in March of that same year, the entire caravan was gathered at this point. The 400-person expedition included soldiers, families, servants, personal belongings, and livestock. Two thirds of the colonizers were from the Iberian Peninsula (Spain, Portugal, and the Canary Islands). There was even one from Greece and another from Flanders. The rest were Mexican Indians and mestizos (mixed bloods).

    Pauline Chavez Bent has written an interesting account of this first Thanksgiving, which you can read on the New Mexico Genealogical Society’s Web site at: http://www.nmgs.org/art1stThanks.htm

    Many Americans mistakenly believe that the Pilgrims were the first to settle in this new land. However, the following all preceded the Pilgrims of 1620:

    With several colonies already established prior to the Pilgrims’ later arrival in 1620, one can assume that others also celebrated an occasional thanksgiving feast. The only surviving record of such a feast, however, is the one in 1598 by Don Juan de Oñate and his group of Spanish settlers.

    To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter message board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Message Board."

    [Return to Table of Contents]


    - Dell Adds Competition to PocketPC Market

    This newsletter has contained a number of articles about the ease of using handheld computers while on genealogy research trips. Whether visiting your local library or the county courthouse near your ancestor’s homestead, genealogists appreciate the convenience of instantly looking up records on a handheld device weighing less than one pound.

    The drawback of these devices has been pricing; limited-power devices that use the Palm operating system used to cost $250 or more. The more powerful Windows CE PocketPC devices originally cost $400 and more, often much more. However, the computer manufacturers never stand still; prices continue to plummet.

    This week, well-known computer manufacturer Dell introduced its entry into the PocketPC market. The "Basic" version of the Dell Axim sells for $199 after a $50 rebate. Despite the low price, the Axim has a full-color transflective TFT screen, 32 megabytes of memory, a Compact Flash Type II expansion slot, and a Secure Digital expansion slot. For an extra $100, the buyer can select a faster machine with double the memory. Even the lower-priced version is faster than the popular Compaq IPAQ handheld. Both versions of the Axim should be capable of storing data about thousands of individuals in a Windows CE genealogy program such as The Pocket Genealogist.

    I imagine that other vendors are going to have to drop prices to compete. Until then, Dell probably will sell millions of these handheld computers.

    You can read more about Dell’s powerful and low-cost handheld computers at http://www.dell.com/us/en/gen/topics/segtopic_axim.htm and at http://www.dell.com/us/en/gen/corporate/press/pressoffice_news_2002-11-18-lv-000.htm

    To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter message board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Message Board."

    [Return to Table of Contents]


    - Public Beta of The Pocket Genealogist 2.50

    Speaking of handheld computers, Kevin R. Phillips of Northern Hills Software has announced that a beta release of The Pocket Genealogist version 2.50 is now available. This program is the leading genealogy application for the iPAQ, HP Jornada, and other handheld computers that use the Windows CE operating system. It should operate on the new Dell Axim as well. You can read my reviews of earlier versions of The Pocket Genealogist at: http://www.rootsforum.com/archives/news0051.htm and http://www.rootsforum.com/archives/news0122.htm.

    Version 2.50 of this pocket powerhouse adds a number of new and updated features. Two features seem especially significant:

    You can read more about the public beta of The Pocket Genealogist version 2.50 at: http://www.northernhillssoftware.com/pgeniebeta.htm

    If you are interested in genealogy applications on pocket computers, you might want to sign up for the "Pocket Genealogist Newsletter" at: http://www.northernhillssoftware.com/contact.htm

    To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter message board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Message Board."

    [Return to Table of Contents]


    - Genealogy by Genetics

    This week I had a chance to view a 30-minute informational videotape produced by Family Tree DNA, a Houston firm that provides DNA testing services to genealogists. The "Genealogy by Genetics" video was informative, describing the company’s services in some detail. While the company obviously produced the video with the hope of increasing sales, it focused primarily on information and examples of the company’s services, complete with testimonials from a number of very satisfied customers. The video is such a "soft sell" that it never mentions pricing or ordering details. Near the end of the video, the viewer is simply referred to the company’s Web site and e-mail for those details.

    Family Tree DNA is a company founded by Bennett Greenspan. He is also the narrator of the videotape. Greenspan starts by describing his own genealogy roadblock. Some years ago he had compiled a list of ancestors and other family members in the U.S. but had not been able to prove the family’s origins in Europe. Greenspan describes how he read about the 1998 DNA study that proved the male ancestry of Sally Hemmings’ children. The study of Y-chromosome DNA in a number of Hemmings’ living descendants proved their descent either from Thomas Jefferson or from one of Jefferson’s close relatives. Greenspan decided to investigate the use of similar technology to prove his descent, as well as his possible relationship to other Greenspans that had not yet been proven to be relatives.

    Greenspan found that DNA studies were very expensive at the time. After investigating a number of alternatives, he found that Professor Michael Hammer, a PhD geneticist and biotechnology research scientist at the University of Arizona, had developed a method of affordable DNA testing. Aided by Hammer and a number of other geneticists, Greenspan then founded Family Tree DNA to provide this technology to genealogists.

    The video explains that DNA testing generally does not solve genealogy puzzles by itself. Instead, it is used along with traditional genealogy research methods. As a result, many previously unsolvable puzzles can now be solved.

    DNA’s most powerful use is in surname studies that try to find common ancestors of a number of individuals with the same surnames. DNA testing will prove that these "genetic cousins" are, indeed, related; that is, all descended from a common ancestor.

    The company has many stories of customers who were able to prove or disprove their lineages back several centuries. DNA testing by itself, however, will not identify the names, dates, and locations of individual ancestors. Nonetheless, it can conclusively prove that two or more males are related, descended from a common person in the all-male line of descent. These two individuals typically share a surname, except in cases of adoption or other reasons for name changes. In fact, DNA testing is excellent for proving the true ancestry of an adopted individual.

    Y-chromosome DNA is only passed from male to male. Obviously, women cannot benefit directly from this testing. However, a woman can get the same conclusive results by having a brother, father, or cousin on her father’s side of the family tested. In the same manner, test results from a male cousin on your mother’s side of the family can provide conclusive evidence of your mother’s male ancestors.

    Y-chromosome DNA occasionally goes through mutations -- small changes in the DNA structure. By studying which descendants share the same mutations, Family Tree DNA can often gauge how closely two individuals are related. This testing does not specify exactly how close the relationship is, but typically it can say that two people are related within a very few generations or, conversely, the two only share a common ancestor some centuries ago.

    Female lines of descent can be proven by mitochondrial DNA that is passed only from mother to daughter. You can read more about both types of DNA tests at http://www.familytreedna.com/description.html. Individual Y chromosome testing is available from as low as $149. Prices for mitochondrial DNA testing start at $219. Various "packages" are available. Pricing details may be found at http://www.familytreedna.com/products.html.

    The videotape details several success stories in which Americans, Canadians, Australians, Israelis, Argentineans, and others living in geographically dispersed areas have proven that they are related. Quite a few of these families have also proven relationships with people of the same name in a number of European countries. These results are especially valuable in the case of Russian or other eastern European ancestry where written documentation is often difficult to find.

    Family Tree DNA started with a 12-marker test, which does a good job of proving that people are not related but is not as accurate at proving relationships. The company soon switched to a 25-marker test that now provides irrefutable proof of male relationships.

    Family Tree DNA’s method of obtaining the DNA material is simple and non-invasive. A small brush that looks a bit like a toothbrush is used to brush the inside of the cheek, then is placed in a vial and mailed to the company’s Houston headquarters. The process is simple and pain-free, unlike the method of obtaining DNA information from blood samples.

    I have written a number of times about what I believe to be the "next big wave" in genealogy: genetics and DNA. I often described the use of DNA as something to be done in the future. However, Family Tree DNA provides those services today. You need to wait no longer.

    For more information about Family Tree DNA’s services, or to obtain more information about using genetics to prove your relationship to others, go to: http://www.familytreedna.com/

    Looking for a program for a future meeting of your local genealogy society? I’d suggest that the 30-minute video that I watched this week might generate some good discussion. Contact the company at info@FamilyTreeDNA.com.

    To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter message board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Message Board."

    [Return to Table of Contents]


    - America, America: A CD-ROM Gazetteer

    America, America is subtitled, "A Gazetteer of The First 48 States." This new CD-ROM for Windows and Macintosh has the equivalent of 1,300 printed pages of information. It lists almost every place name ever found in the United States. This large reference is the work of one person: Kay Downs Brown. I had a chance to use her new CD-ROM for a while this week.

    A gazetteer is a geographic dictionary or index. It is a bit like an atlas, only it has printed lists of locations instead of printed maps. The format of America, America is very simple: it lists states, counties, towns and villages. It tells where each is located. America, America covers the 48 continental states and excludes Alaska and Hawaii.

    Place names are listed in alphabetical order within each state. Symbols indicate whether the name is a post office [p.o.], hamlet [h], township +, junction ~, railroad station [rrs], or a railroad village [rrv], and so forth.

    Several symbols noted by one place (such as village, town, and city) mean each entity has existed in different time periods as the place grew and was incorporated into the larger designations. When a place has appeared in more than one county, it is so noted with the most recent county in bold letters. Former or variant place names, or what a place has evolved (from or to), are indicated by arrows.

    Also included are county directories for each state, listing when the county was created and the parent counties as well as the county seat, with the telephone and FAX numbers for each.

    The information was compiled from maps, postal guides, the U.S. Government’s Geographic Names Index Service, shipping guides, atlases, gazetteers, business directories, city, county, and state histories, Internet resources, and more. I checked for some tiny villages that I know about in Aroostook County, Maine, and found every one of them listed. Even the tiny village of Robinson is listed, and it is a cluster of perhaps a dozen houses. I suspect the information is equally good for the other 47 states.

    This tiny piece of plastic contains two different versions of the data, each containing the equivalent of 1,343 printed pages of information. You can see a sample of the information displayed by this CD-ROM at http://www.placesandcounties.com/example.htm.

    The two versions of the information on the America, America CD-ROM are in different formats: Adobe Acrobat PDF files and again in WordPerfect WPD files. Use of Acrobat means that the CD-ROM is universal: it can be used on any Windows, Windows CE handheld, Macintosh, or Linux system and probably a few others as well. The CD-ROM includes a free copy of Acrobat Reader for Windows. Anyone using a different operating system can download the appropriate Acrobat viewer software at http://www.Adobe.com.

    The Adobe Acrobat version of the data is easy to search. I found that I could conduct simple searches looking for a single word or a specific phrase. The search capabilities include the ability either to search for words that sound like the one you specified or to search a thesaurus of similar words. Data found can easily be printed. There is no capability to copy and paste data into another application, however.

    The WordPerfect version of the database can be read with most regular word processors in place of Adobe Acrobat. If your word processor can read WordPerfect files, you can use that program’s search capabilities as well as the copy and paste functions. I used Microsoft Word XP to open the files and was able to copy and paste data as I wished. I also found that I could save the files on a hard drive in any of several formats, including DOC and RTF. Word did not preserve all of the original text formatting, however.

    America, America: A Gazetteer of The First 48 States is a good reference for the genealogist. This CD-ROM can be used to find villages and other locations specified in old records; information that can be difficult to locate otherwise. The disk sells for $29.95 (U.S. funds) and is available directly from Kay Downs Brown. There is no capability for ordering online at this time.

    More information about America, America: A Gazetteer of The First 48 States can be found at http://www.PlacesAndCounties.com

    To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter message board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Message Board."

    [Return to Table of Contents]


    - Pathe News Film Archive

    Writing on CompuServe’s Genealogy Forums, David Geoffrey Watkins described the The Pathe News Film Archive. This is an online archive of old newsreels. These newsreels played in cinemas from 1910 to 1970, providing the primary method of viewing the news stories of the first half of the twentieth century. Television news programs eventually doomed the biweekly newsreel bulletins.

    Pathe is one of the oldest media companies in the world, founded by Charles Pathe in Paris in the 1890s. The company moved to London in 1902, and by 1910 was producing the famous bi-weekly newsreel, the Pathe Gazette. After the First World War, Pathe started producing various Cinemagazines as well. By 1930 they were producing the Gazette, the Pathetone Weekly, the Pathe Pictorial, and Eve's Film Review, the latter covering entertainment, culture, and women’s' issues. By the time Pathe finally stopped producing the cinema newsreel in 1970, they had accumulated 3500 hours of filmed history amounting to over 90,000 individual items. The British Pathe company is now owned by the Daily Mail and General Trust Group.

    The Pathe News Film Archive contains those films. Newsreels at the archive cover many of the major events of the 20th century, including the two world wars, the great depression, the great strike of 1926, and man walking on the moon. If your ancestor was present at a major news event of the day, it is possible that you will see him or her on the film. The Pathe News Film Archive material consists of almost 100,000 individual stories. The entire length of film could stretch from London to New York. The 3,500 hours of footage took 50,000 hours to process into digital format and would take the average TV viewer two and a half years to watch.

    Now the entire archive has been stored online for the first time, and private individuals can view much of it for free. Professional usage requires payment of a license fee. Viewing the newsreels online requires Windows Media Player. The same newsreels can be purchased on DVD disks and VHS videotapes.

    I spent some time in the online digital archives and enjoyed watching some World War II documentaries and earlier footage of the 1936 Berlin Olympics. When the film first starts to play, you see the video in a tiny, postage stamp-sized window on your screen. Double-clicking on the image converts into a full-screen but grainy movie. The audio that accompanies the film has the same low-fidelity music and excited announcer’s voice that many of us listened to in cinemas. As one might expect, the newsreels have a British viewpoint but cover stories from all over the world. For instance, the coverage of the 1936 Olympics focused primarily on British athletes although several others were also briefly mentioned.

    The digital transfer of these archives was paid for by the Lottery’s New Opportunities Fund, which will tour poor areas of south London in a "digi-van" to give people access to the material. I think this is a rather novel use of lottery monies although I wonder how many residents of the poorer neighborhoods of south London are demanding to see such newsreels.

    To learn more about this archive or to view the newsreels online, go to: http://www.britishpathe.com

    To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter message board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Message Board."

    [Return to Table of Contents]


    - Tracing African-American Ancestry

    Tony Burroughs has been mentioned in this newsletter many times. An expert genealogist, lecturer, and teacher, he is also the author of "Black Roots," the leading book today on the topic of African-American genealogy research. This week the Christian Science Monitor carried a long article about Tony. It also gives a lot of information on how to get started in genealogy.

    Tony has been able to trace his roots back to 1773, and he has discovered family members in 16 states and four countries. He hopes to search even further back in time, but documentation grows scarce in the early 1700s and has very rarely crossed the Atlantic.

    In the article, Burroughs states that the most difficult part of researching African-American ancestry is not related to slavery. It is, he says, in the 75 years that followed the abolition of slavery. He tells reporter Elizabeth Armstrong how to organize a genealogy research effort into the records of Black Americans.

    This is an interesting article for all genealogists and a "must read" for anyone researching Black roots. You can read the article at: http://www.csmonitor.com/2002/1120/p16s01-lign.html

    To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter message board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Message Board."

    [Return to Table of Contents]


    - Fun Stuff for Genealogists

    As the name implies, funstuffforgenealogists.com has some rather unique and interesting items for sale. They sell genealogy T-shirts, sweatshirts, bumper stickers, pedigree charts, jewelry, mouse pads, neckties, and a lot more. The wording on these items is often humorous. I particularly like the shot glass ("Genealogy is a Shot in the Dark") and the bumper sticker of "I Stop For Cemeteries."

    Looking for a Christmas present for another genealogist? This might be the place.

    No, this is not a paid advertisement. I just like Bev Petersen’s products. You can see them online at http://www.funstuffforgenealogists.com

    To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter message board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Message Board."

    [Return to Table of Contents]


    - (+) Genealogy Database Contributes to Identity Theft?

    This article is a Plus Edition-only article. It is copyright 2002 by Richard W. Eastman and is restricted to viewing solely by subscribers to the Plus Edition of this newsletter. Details about the Plus Edition are available at: http://www.RootsForum.com/plus

    [Return to Table of Contents]


    - The Mysterious Genealogy of Russian President Putin

    In the United States there is a joke that says, "Why pay for anyone to research your family tree? Just get elected to public office!" Indeed, the ancestry of U.S. presidents, vice presidents and other notable government officials are often researched before the officials take office.

    Russian President Vladimir Putin isn’t so lucky. Researchers have been stumped while trying to find the origins of Putin’s grandfather, Spiridon Putin, who left Tver for St. Petersburg at the age of 15. However, there is a slight hint that Vladimir Putin could have royal blood.

    You can read more about this at Pravda’s Web site at: http://english.pravda.ru/main/2002/11/05/39169.html

    To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter message board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Message Board."

    [Return to Table of Contents]


    - Update to Last Week’s "Piece of the Scottish Highlands" Article

    Last week’s newsletter carried an article about a Web site that advertises the sale of souvenir one-square-foot plots of land on Clett Island, located off Scotland’s Isle of Skye. I questioned the owner’s claim on the Web site that part of the buyer’s fee was being donated to charities that benefit the local wildlife.

     I read those words on the Clett Island Web site when I looked at it for the first time in October and then wrote the article for use in the Nov. 18 newsletter. After the newsletter was published, I received an e-mail from Richard Haigh, the person selling the plots. He offered a correction and explanation. He stated that the words in question had appeared on the Web site at one time but never should have been there. Mr. Haigh said that the references were “in connection with an ftp/upload error we had made, internally, and which lasted for around 1 week.” He also assured me that the references had been corrected well in advance of the publication of last week’s newsletter.

    You can see the current wording at http://www.clett.com.

    To discuss this story further, please go to http://rootsforum.com/cgi-bin/ikonboard.cgi?s=a11930cb99077d4ba84e8b506aa14622;act=ST;f=1;t=100

    [Return to Table of Contents]


    - Printing or E-mailing This Newsletter

    This newsletter used to be sent by e-mail, but the new Standard Edition is now only available on the Web. Several people have written to say that they were disappointed as they used to save it as a file on their hard drive or would mail it to a friend. Others said that they liked it when they could read the newsletter at their leisure in e-mail, whereas now they must read it online. Actually, you can still do all of those things. In fact, you can easily do so with any Web page.

    To save the newsletter Standard Edition as a file on your own hard drive, go to the newsletter’s page at http://www.RootsForum.com/newsletter and then, in your Web browser, select FILE, and then select SAVE AS…

    To mail the newsletter Standard Edition to a friend – or even to yourself so that you may have an e-mail copy – go to the newsletter’s page at http://www.RootsForum.com/newsletter and then, in your Web browser, select FILE, select SEND, and then follow the instructions on your screen.

    These instructions will work for all the recent versions of Internet Explorer and Netscape. I suspect that other Web browsers have similar capabilities.

    To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter message board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Message Board."

    [Return to Table of Contents]


    - (+) A Question About Plus Edition Delivery Format

    This article is a Plus Edition-only article. It is copyright 2002 by Richard W. Eastman and is restricted to viewing solely by subscribers to the Plus Edition of this newsletter. Details about the Plus Edition are available at: http://www.RootsForum.com/plus

    [Return to Table of Contents]


    - Home Pages Highlighted

    The "Home Pages Highlighted" section consists of new genealogy-related home pages that you, the readers of this newsletter, nominate for publication in this newsletter. While anyone may nominate any genealogy-related home page, the process seems to work best when the webmaster for a home page nominates his or her own work. You are invited to enter your nomination online at http://www.rootsforum.com.

    The following is a list of some of the genealogy-related World Wide Web home pages that have recently been listed by newsletter readers at http://www.rootsforum.com:

    California research information - lists all County Recorder addresses/phone numbers; prices, etc. Searches can be conducted of birth records: 1905-1995; California death records: 1905-1999; California marriage records: 1949-1986; California divorce records: 1966-1984. Some searches require payment of a fee. http://home.pacbell.net/cageni/

    Sabin, Clary, Irland, Snelson, George, and Knapp genealogy. Includes descendancy reports, online database, and downloadable GEDCOM. Special features include a Photo Album, Virtual Cemetery, Forum, and Lessons Learned: http://www.sabin-clary.com

    Jan Eri’s personal genealogy database from Norway (Sogn og Fjordane, Akershus) and Denmark: http://janeri.com

    Jane Taubman’s family history in and around the county of Dorset in England - an extensive family tree and photographs and family stories. This site also has a couple of GEDCOM utilities and a date calculator: http://www.taubman.org.uk/family

    Millirons and Haynie Families - There are 3333 names in this family tree. The earliest recorded event is the Birth of Gilbert JOSSELYN in 1091: http://www.tribalpages.com/tribes/phaynie

    Descendants of Bertrand Chesnay dit Lagarenne, son of Nicolas Chesnay dit Lagarenne and Catherine La Ringue, born in St.Brieux, D'Yffiniac, Bretagne, France February 1622. Bertrand died 16 Jan 1683 in Château Richer, Montmorency, Quebec, at 60 years of age. http://www.homestead.com/CHESNAY

    P*rr*rr Society: A one-name study group for those interested in origins of Parrett, Parrott, Perrett, Porritt, and similar spellings http://www.p-rr-tt.org.uk

    David Sylvester’s New England Ancestors - Featuring the Ancestry of John Herbert Merry, Sadie Jane Dyer, Evangeline Estelle Washburn, and Vivian Daniel Sylvester: http://www.mdwsweb.com/genealogy

    Obituary Lookup Volunteers - an all-volunteer web site and mailing list dedicated to providing obituary lookups all over the world: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~obitl

    Comprehensive research of family names: Dagg, Scragg, Casson, and Heritage. This site also has links to Canada and to Irish Dagg research: http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/jazzer

    Lannert genealogical information on the net: Most Lannerts have been traced to the Odenwald Mountain region of Hessen, Germany, with a few others to Romania and Hungary. These following names have possible connections: Lanert, Lannerd, Lanhart, Lahnart, Lanhardt, Lanardt, Lahnert, Launart, Lannard, Lannart, Lanart, Leanert, Lammert, Lennert, Lenard, Lahner, Lanort, Lannort, Lanwert, Sannert, Sanard, Leonard. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~heritagecrossroads/homelan1.htm

    Genealogy Website for Westford, Massachusetts; Atwood families of New England (18,000); and other allied families (Berner, Kelly, MacDonald, Novotny, Page, Pereira, and Potts): http://www.genesisgenealogy.org

    English-German Brandl Surname site related to German-speaking European countries and the USA: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~brandlsurname/

    Gierhart Family Inn for Gerhart, Gearhart, Gierhart, and other spellings: http://gierhart.tripod.com

    NELMS family history in England and Australia, with lots of links to other genealogy sites: http://peter_nelms.tripod.com/Family_History.html

    Genealogy on the Harris, Miller, Bentley, Weatherwax, and Zamora families. Contains our family history, recipes, scrapbook, and more: http://www.geocities.com/rzamor1

    Research site for Hammond, Ellis, Flowers, Mumford, Gardner, Griffin, Gary, Rinehart, McQuilliams, Wiley, Stevenson, Espy, and many, many more: http://hammondsearching.homestead.com/Index.html

    Eitniear and Allied Families - Contains over 38,000 individuals both direct and indirectly linked to the Eitniear or Cherry surnames. Photos, documents, sources, resources, links, etc.: http://eitniear_cherry.tripod.com/eitniearandalliedfamilies/

    Goetsch, Carroll, Meinert, Marx, Gilmore - Thousands of names in the online GEDCOM: http://www.goetsch.com

    To submit your genealogy page to this newsletter, enter the necessary information at: http://www.rootsforum.com. Due to the volume of new Web pages submitted, I am not able to list all of them in the newsletter.

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    The PR Budget for this newsletter is $0.00. I rely upon "word of mouse" advertising in which you recommend this newsletter to your friends. This newsletter is a private project of mine, and I have a zero budget for a publicity campaign to get more readers.

    In each issue, I try to offer you useful, interesting and sometimes amusing information to help you with your genealogy efforts. Can you take a minute to help me out in return? If you think this newsletter is a worthwhile read, please tell your friends. Better yet, suggest they can read the Standard Edition or subscribe to the Plus Edition at http://www.RootsForum.com.

    Thanks.


    Are you interested in the articles in this newsletter? Would you like to learn more or ask questions or make comments about these articles? Join this newsletter’s online discussion group. Go to http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Message Board."

    You can also search past newsletters at the same address: http://www.RootsForum.com

    If you would like to submit news, information or press releases for possible inclusion in future newsletters, send them to richard@eastman.net. The author does reserve the right to accept or reject any articles submitted.

    COPYRIGHTS:

    The contents of this newsletter are copyright by Richard W. Eastman with the following exception:

    Many of the articles published in these newsletters contain quotes or references from others, especially from other Web sites, software user’s manuals, press releases and other public announcements. Any words in this newsletter attributed to another person or organization remain the copyrighted materials of the original author(s).

    You are hereby granted rights, unless otherwise specified, to re-distribute articles from this newsletter to other parties provided:

      1. You do so strictly for non-commercial purposes
      2. Articles marked with a Plus Sign (+) are not to be redistributed. Those articles are solely for the use of Plus Edition subscribers.
      3. You may not republish any articles containing words attributed to another person or organization until you obtain permission from that person or organization. While you do have permission to republish words written by Richard W. Eastman, you do not have automatic authority to republish words written by others, even if their words appear in this newsletter.

    Also, please include the following statement with any articles you re-distribute:

    The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2002 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.RootsForum.com.

    Thank you for your cooperation.

     

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

    Dick Eastman is a frequent presenter at major genealogy conferences. He has published articles in Genealogical Computing and Family Chronicle magazines and for a number of Web sites. He was an advisor to PBS' Ancestry series and appeared as a guest in one of the episodes. He serves on the Advisory Board of the New England Historic Genealogical Society and is a past Director of GENTECH and of the New England Computer Genealogists. Dick is the author of YOUR ROOTS: Total Genealogy Planning On Your Computer published by Ziff-Davis Press. He also manages three Genealogy Forums on CompuServe. He can be reached at: richard@eastman.net. Due to the volume of e-mail received, he is unable to answer every e-mail message received.

    If you have questions or comments about the article in this newsletter, go to http://www.RootsForum.com and then click on "Message Board." Post your message there. You will receive then assistance from Dick Eastman or from a number of other people.

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    To obtain a subscription to Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter – Plus Edition, go to http://www.RootsForum.com/plus

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