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Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

Standard Edition

A Weekly Summary of Events and Topics of Interest to Online Genealogists

Vol. 8 No. 21 – May 26, 2003

This newsletter relies solely upon "word of mouse" advertising. If you enjoy reading these articles, please tell others to go to http://www.RootsForum.com.

Some of the articles in this Plus Edition newsletter are restricted to your personal use.

Search previous issues of Standard Edition newsletters at: http://www.RootsForum.com

Plus Edition subscribers may gain access to a reserved section of the Discussion Board. Details are available at http://www.rootsforum.com/plus/messageboard.htm.

Listen to Dick Eastman’s broadcast on FamilyHistoryRadio.com.

Copyright© 2003 by Richard W. Eastman. All rights reserved.


IN THIS ISSUE:

- Next Week's Newsletter Will Be Delayed
- (+) Follow-up to "How to Select a Genealogy Program"
- (+) Your Ancestors' Experiences at Ellis Island
- The Genealogist's British Indexing Project Online
- (+) Publishing Your Genealogy Book on Demand
- Send an Adult to Camp This Summer
- Porter County, Indiana, Public Library Online
- Seeking War Letters
- 1930 Census Images of the Rich and Famous
- René Jetté, R.I.P.
- Move the Dead for a Commuter Rail Line
- Follow-up: Australian Genealogy Roadshow 2003
- A Tartan Credit Card
- OpenOffice.org 1.1 Beta2
- Home Pages Highlighted

Items marked with a Plus Sign (+) appear only in the Plus Edition newsletter.


I trace my family history so I will know whom to blame.


- Next Week's Newsletter Will Be Delayed

I am heading to the annual conference of the U.S. National Genealogical Society soon. I suspect that this year's event will be as busy as all the past events in recent years. I doubt if I will have a chance to write next week's newsletter while I am there or during the return trip home. As a result, I expect next week's newsletter to be posted a day or two later than usual.

In return for your patience, I expect that next week I will write about the conference and will also list all the new genealogy-related products and services that I am able to find.

If you attend this year's conference, make sure you stop by Booth #103 to say "Hello." I will be in that booth along with Newsletter Editor Pam Cerutti and several friends during the conference. We hope to meet subscribers and also to publicize the newsletter among the non-subscribers at the conference. While there, be sure to sign up for a chance to win a handheld iPAQ computer and Pocket Genealogist software that will be given away to a lucky newsletter subscriber on Saturday afternoon. Full details of the drawing are available at: http://www.rootsforum.com/ipaq.htm

I'll either see you in Pittsburgh or tell you about the conference in next week's newsletter.

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- (+) Follow-up to "How to Select a Genealogy Program"

This is a "preview" from a Plus Edition-only article that is available only to subscribers to the Plus Edition of this newsletter. To learn how to subscribe to the Plus Edition, go to http://www.RootsForum.com/plus

In last week's Plus Edition, I described some of the selection criteria you should use when selecting a genealogy program. I also listed fourteen of the more popular Windows genealogy programs and two popular Macintosh genealogy programs. I also mentioned a couple of others that are not yet popular but have generated news in recent weeks.

Several people asked why their favorite program wasn't mentioned. After all, there are many, many more than the eighteen programs that I listed. The quick answers are:

  1. There are more than 400 genealogy programs available, according to at least one list. Last week's article already was quite lengthy; a full description of each of the 400+ programs would fill several newsletters!

  2. It has already been done.

This week I decided to tell you where to find information about all the genealogy programs.

End of "preview."

To read the rest of this article, you must be a subscriber to the Plus Edition. If you subscribe today, you will receive this article. To learn how to subscribe to the Plus Edition, go to http://www.RootsForum.com/plus

[Return to Table of Contents]


- (+) Your Ancestors' Experiences at Ellis Island

This is a "preview" from a Plus Edition-only article that is available only to subscribers to the Plus Edition of this newsletter. To learn how to subscribe to the Plus Edition, go to http://www.RootsForum.com/plus

Close to the mouth of the Hudson River in New York harbor is a small island which is forever etched in our country's history. Formerly known as Oyster Island, Ellis Island was the gateway to the new land for more than 10 million immigrants between its opening in 1892 and its closing in 1931. For most of these "huddled masses yearning to breathe free," processing through Ellis Island often required several days. What was it like for these newcomers? What were their first experiences in the "new world?"

End of "preview."

To read the rest of this article, you must be a subscriber to the Plus Edition. If you subscribe today, you will receive this article. To learn how to subscribe to the Plus Edition, go to http://www.RootsForum.com/plus

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- The Genealogist's British Indexing Project Online

For some time now, each of the census products published by British Data Archive have been targeted for name indexing projects. The projects’ results appear online on The Genealogist, a Web site sponsored by S&N Genealogy Supplies and the British Data Archive. The site contains data supplied by more than 900 family historian volunteers. These experienced genealogists are currently indexing various pieces of the British census records. The result is much higher quality indexes than some of the current product offerings from other producers that were indexed by less-experienced individuals.

I took a look at the site this week and found that it is shaping up nicely. The British Indexing Project has several indexes published already, and many more are coming soon.

The online indexes are the same as those sold on CD-ROM by S&N Genealogy Supplies with one major exception: the CD issues of the indexes are updated quarterly, while the online version is updated every few weeks. This results in more records being available online than on CD at any given time.

Each county census will have a separate index. I found the following are available today:

Herefordshire 1891 (Complete)
Lancashire 1891
London 1871
London 1891
London 1861
Wiltshire 1891 (Complete)
Yorkshire 1891

Worcestershire indexes will be available soon. Other counties and years are planned.

The indexes are still being built, except for the two listed as "complete." Nonetheless, a lot of good information is available today.

There are two different searches available on this Web site: basic and advanced. The basic search allows the user to search by surname and forename (first name). You can optionally specify the age of the individuals you seek as well. The advanced search is very similar except that it allows searching for specific areas, even without a forename. Wild card characters may be used in either search to match any number of characters after the first 3. Thus 'Ken*' will match Kent, as well as Kendall, and Kennedy.

I logged onto the Genealogist Web site and did a search for my own surname. Here are a few records that I found in the 1891 Wiltshire census index; they can serve as examples of what you can find online today:

Surname 

Forename 

Age 

Area 

Piece Number 

Folio Number 

Eastman

Albert

14

Alderbury, Downton

1619

059a

Eastman

Bertha M

12

Alderbury, Downton

1619

059a

Eastman

Elizabeth

89

Alderbury, Downton

1619

050b

Eastman

George

29

Alderbury, Downton

1619

050b

Eastman

Henry

48

Alderbury, Downton

1619

059a

Eastman

Henry E

20

Alderbury, Downton

1619

059a

 

The Piece Number and Folio Number are pointers to the location of the original census record. You will always want to check the originals since they give a lot more information than what you can find in these indexes. The full records may include full name, exact age, relationship to head of household, sex, occupation, parish and county of birth, medical disabilities and employment status.

The census records are available on microfiche, which can be examined at a number of genealogy libraries. You probably won't want to purchase these records yourself; the cost of the microfiche for London alone is around £5,000 ($8,200 in U.S. funds). However, S&N Genealogy Supplies sells CD-ROM images of the same microfiche census records for a much lower price. For instance, the same London 1891 census microfiche can be purchased as images on CD-ROM or DVD-ROM disks for £49.95 (about $82 U.S.), a 99% price reduction for exactly the same information.

You can find a complete catalog of the census records available on S&N Genealogy Supplies' Web site at: http://www.genealogysupplies.com/

The Genealogist's British Indexing Project is becoming a valuable tool for anyone researching British ancestry. It is powerful, and millions of records are already available online today. Best of all is the price: £5 for three months or £14.95 a year (about $8.20 and $24.60 U.S. respectively). If you would like to help this worthwhile project by indexing some records yourself, you can even obtain some free access. Details about all of the above, along with the indexes, are available on the Genealogist's British Indexing Project Web site at: http://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/

To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter Discussion Board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Discussion Board."

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- (+) Publishing Your Genealogy Book on Demand

This is a "preview" from a Plus Edition-only article that is available only to subscribers to the Plus Edition of this newsletter. To learn how to subscribe to the Plus Edition, go to http://www.RootsForum.com/plus

Would you like to publish the results of your genealogy research? Does your genealogy society or family name organization want to publish data in book form? Publishing genealogy books has long been an expensive proposition. Genealogy authors often have paid in advance $5,000 to $10,000 or more to a book publisher in order to have a book published. However, new business models today can reduce those "up front" expenses to as low as $99, thanks to online services.

End of "preview."

To read the rest of this article, you must be a subscriber to the Plus Edition. If you subscribe today, you will receive this article. To learn how to subscribe to the Plus Edition, go to http://www.RootsForum.com/plus

[Return to Table of Contents]


- Send an Adult to Camp This Summer

The following is an announcement from the East Tennessee Historical Society:

Kids Can Send an Adult to Camp This Summer

ETHS Family Tree Camp Gives Families Time to Learn Family History Together

If sending your kids off to summer camp makes you feel nostalgic for your own camp experiences, then the East Tennessee Historical Society’s summer camp is designed for you. This year, summer camp comes with a twist as kids are invited to bring along an adult family member to participate in the ETHS Family Tree Camp. The camp will be held July 7-10 at the ETHS headquarters in the East Tennessee History Center in downtown Knoxville. The camp is designed for children age 9 to 13. Cost is $35 per child and $5 for each adult family member.

At the camp, kids will enjoy learning methods to research their family tree, such as talking to older relatives, using original records, visiting cemeteries and libraries, and touring history museums. Each participant is invited to bring along an adult family member to help them "dig their roots."

"Many of today’s families feel like there aren’t enough activities they can do together," says Lisa Oakley, ETHS curator of education. "The ETHS Family Tree Camp provides families with an activity they can do together not just during the camp, but for years to come. Part of the fun of genealogy—the study of family trees—is the interaction between generations as young people interview older relatives and hear the stories and events that have become part of a family’s history."

The week will include tours of the East Tennessee History Center, and participants will receive instruction in using libraries and internet research, with research time in the McClung Historical Collection and Knox County Archives.

Oakley notes that past year’s camp included participation from grandfathers, mothers, fathers, and aunts. One family "team" even came to the camp from Florida to be a part of the experience and research East Tennessee roots. Participation is not limited to those with East Tennessee roots, however.

Oakley says, "The camp also plants the seeds of interest in history in today’s children, helping participants develop an interest in preserving their family and community history wherever their community may be."

The ETHS Family Tree Camp will be held at the East Tennessee History Center, 600 Market St., Knoxville, from 9 a.m. to noon, July 7-10. Space is limited in the camp and pre-registration is required. To register, contact Lisa Oakley at oakley@east-tennessee-history.org or 865-215-8828.

The East Tennessee Historical Society, founded in 1834, is one of the oldest cultural institutions in the state of Tennessee. ETHS, a non-profit organization headquartered in Knoxville, is dedicated to preserving, interpreting, and promoting the history of the region. The society’s activities, exhibits, and programs are made possible through the support of its membership. The society is currently involved in a public-private partnership with Knox County to help construct the new East Tennessee History Center, scheduled to open in late 2004. For additional information about the Family Tree Camp or other ETHS programs, call 865-215-8824 or visit the historical society’s web site at http://www.east-tennessee-history.org

To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter Discussion Board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Discussion Board."

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- Porter County, Indiana, Public Library Online

The Porter County Public Library System has completed its new PCPLS Web site and online catalog. The Web site is an extension of the "bricks and mortar" libraries in the system, allowing patrons access to ample resources for research and information about library activities from their home computer. Best of all, the site includes genealogy information of interest to anyone researching ancestors who lived in the county.

The Porter County Genealogy Department page offers an index to the 1930 Porter County Census. The index lists surname, first name, township, and the page number where the complete listing may be found in the original census records.

The Web site also offers an index to the obituaries published in the Vidette-Times from 1967 to 1994. The index lists last name, first name, middle, maiden name, age, date of death, newspaper publication date, and the township of residence. You can also order a copy of the obituary while on the same Web site. The copies are made by library personnel and sent to you in the mail. The fee for copies is $1.00 each.

The Porter County Public Library System Web site also has links to numerous other genealogy Web sites of interest to anyone researching Indiana ancestry. You can find all this at: http://www.pcpls.lib.in.us

To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter Discussion Board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Discussion Board."

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- Seeking War Letters

Some of you may be familiar with Andrew Carroll, best-selling author of Letters of a Nation and War Letters and founder of the Legacy Project, which collects and preserves war letters (See http://www.honoringourancestors.com/library.html#eight for other articles about him.). He’s launching yet another initiative and is requesting your help in honoring our veterans and active duty personnel.

In brief, Andy is seeking war letters by foreign-born participants (combatants, peace-keeping forces, nurses, civilians, war brides, etc.) in any conflict in which the U.S. has been involved. These include the American Revolution, the Civil War, the War of 1812, the Spanish-American War, the Philippines, WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War, Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and so on. Post-conflict correspondence between former enemies is also of great interest.

In fact, in August he will begin an eight-month, 25-nation trip to seek out such letters. As with the 75,000 letters the Legacy Project (LP) already has, all those collected during or as a result of this journey will be donated to a respected museum or archive. Some of the most moving, dramatic, unexpected, amusing, or otherwise exceptional ones may be shared in a book and possibly a documentary (Permission is always obtained from the submitter first.).

Although Andy will start this trip in August, it’s not necessary to wait until then to submit any you might have in your personal collection. This is an excellent opportunity to pay tribute to the veterans and active duty personnel in your family by ensuring that their words and experiences will be captured for posterity.

If you have some letters you’d like to submit, please copy the original and/or make a typed transcript. If a letter is in a language other than English, a translation would be appreciated, but it’s not a requirement. You can email submissions to WarLetterProject@aol.com or mail them to The Legacy Project, P.O. Box 53250, Washington, D.C. 20009 USA. For more information, go to http://www.warletters.com.

To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter Discussion Board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Discussion Board."

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- 1930 Census Images of the Rich and Famous

Michael John Neill has created a nifty Web site that has links to census images of the "rich and famous" in the 1930 census. The site currently has images for the following notables:

Spiro Agnew, Actress Bea Arthur, Vincent Astor estate--a whole page, Erma Bombeck, President Jimmy Carter, President Calvin Coolidge, Marlin Brando, Mel Brooks, George Bush, Ty Cobb, Perry Como, Walter Cronkhite, Phyllis Diller, Walt Disney, Amelia Earhart, Joe Dimaggio, William Faulkner, Henry Fonda, President Gerald Ford, Robert Frost, Katherine Hepburn, Jimmy Hoffa, President Herbert Hoover, President John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr., Ann Landers, Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, Walter Mondale, Bob Newhart, Nancy Reagan, President Ronald Reagan, President Franklin Roosevelt, Babe Ruth, Baseball great Jackie Robinson, Dr. Seuss, Carl Sandburg, John Steinbeck, Jimmie Stewart, Harry Truman, Barbara Walters, Ruth Warrick, Eudora Welty, Laura Ingalls Wilder, and Orville Wright.

You can view the census images of each of these if you first go to: http://www.rootdig.com/1930census

My thanks to Fred Dickerson for telling me about this Web site.

To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter Discussion Board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Discussion Board."

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- René Jetté, R.I.P.

French-Canadian genealogists lost one of the giants of high-quality genealogy scholarship last week. John P. DuLong sent the following notice:

Dear Mr. Eastman,

I thought that I would pass on to you word of the death of René Jetté, Québec's leading genealogist. He died yesterday morning, Sunday 18 May 2003, after a long battle with cancer.

René published numerous books and articles on French Canadian genealogy. His most popular work was his Dictionaire généalogique des familles du Québec (1983), which was the result of his collaboration with the Programme de recherche en démographie historique at the University of Montréal. It is a comprehensive genealogical dictionary of the entire population of Québec from the founding of the colony until 1730. It is a key resource used by thousands of French Canadian researchers.

His most important work remains his masterful Traité de généalogie (1991). In this work, using French genealogical examples, he builds a systematic approach to understanding genealogy research and theory. For a review of this work please see http://habitant.org/Treatise.htm.

Gail F. Moreau-DesHarnais, Roland-Yves Gagné, Fr. Joseph Dubé, and I had the honor of working with René on two projects, the Baillon and Le Neuf research projects, which both led to the publication of articles documenting royal gateways for French Canadians. The Baillon project also resulted in the publication of the Table d'ascendance de Catherine Baillon (12 générations) (2001).

René also contributed to Medieval Genealogy with his article on Agatha, the wife of Edward the Exile, published in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register (1996) in which he proposed a Slavic solution to the problem of her origins.

René could also have fun with genealogy. With Gail F. Moreau-DesHarnais, he researched and published the ancestry of the pop singer Madonna in Michigan's Habitant Heritage (1994).

My friends and I will miss René. He was a wonderfully sharing man, eager to help others, and always willing to consider new ideas and approaches. His contributions to genealogy will not soon be forgotten among French Canadians. We will always be left wondering what other contributions to genealogy René would have made if he had lived longer.

Regards,

John P. DuLong, Ph.D.

I used René Jetté's publications many times in my own genealogy research. I never met him, although I did sit in the audience once and listened to him speak. Even though I did not know him personally, I feel a great loss. I suspect that many other French-Canadian genealogists feel the same.

To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter Discussion Board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Discussion Board."

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- Move the Dead for a Commuter Rail Line

Charlotte, North Carolina, is considering a plan to move its dead. Writing in the New York Times, Nick Madigan describes a controversy that involves local residents and nationwide descendants of the deceased against city officials and the Federal Transit Administration. The key question is, "Who owns the land?"

Cemetery plots are purchased, and the families of those buried hold legal deeds to the land in which family members are buried. However, the city and the Federal Transit Administration have announced that they will dig up about 950 of the 45,000 graves to make room for a commuter rail line. To relatives of the dead, the plan means nothing less than desecration.

The government agencies plan to move the bodies from their "eternal resting places" to make way for a proposed $371 million, 10-mile light-rail track that would run along the so-called southern corridor. The northern line, the commuter track that would affect the cemeteries, has yet to be mapped out, but a preliminary State Department of Transportation study placed it along the eastern edge of the cemeteries, next to an existing freight track. The new line would cut a 100-foot-wide, 1,800-foot-long swath into the cemeteries, where the first grave was dug in 1853. Officials are also considering laying down high-speed and Amtrak rails in the same corridor.

A recent visitor to the cemetery, George Salem, has a deed to the plot his parents bought for $144 in July, 1943. They are now buried in that plot. "The city says it's their property," Mr. Salem said, "but I've got a deed that says I own it."

You can read the entire article at http://www.nytimes.com/2003/05/23/national/23CEME.html?ex=1054699347&ei=1&en=e602232ff05fa7f1

"Show me the manner in which a nation cares for its dead, and I will measure with mathematical exactness the tender mercies of its people, their respect for the laws of the land and their loyalty to high ideals." - William Gladstone

To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter Discussion Board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Discussion Board."

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- Follow-up: Australian Genealogy Roadshow 2003

I wrote about the Australian Genealogy Roadshow 2003 in the April 14, 2003 edition of this newsletter. You can read that at: http://www.rootsforum.com/archives/news0315.htm. A number of genealogy experts from Australia and overseas traveled around the country, giving presentations in a number of cities. The experts included:

Bob Velke from the US (The Master Genealogist)

Rod Neep from the UK (Archive CD Books)

Robin Lamacraft from Australia (Sceya Genealogical Charts)

Apparently the events went well. Bryan Wetton volunteered to help the folks who ran the roadshow. He describes himself as a "genealogy roadie." He writes, "It was a great event around the country, and I have collected 'most' of the images taken by myself and others as a photographic record on my website."

You can view Bryan's Australian Genealogy Roadshow 2003 photo album at http://150.101.237.154/albums/TwentyFive

To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter Discussion Board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Discussion Board."

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- A Tartan Credit Card

Americans proud of their Scottish roots now have the opportunity to demonstrate their love of Scotland with a new credit card that helps to preserve Scottish heritage and clan centres. The Tartan Card aims to cash in on the 12 million Americans with Scottish connections and bears the logo, "Proud American Scot," under the holder’s name.

Every time the user pays for items on their affinity card, which comes in a variety of tartans, a small amount is donated to Scottish scholarship funding or heritage centres. The cards have been endorsed by the Standing Council of Scottish Chiefs (SCSC) and were launched by Ustica, a finance company based in Edinburgh, in conjunction with credit companies, MBNA America and Visa.

While I have a wee bit of Scottish ancestry, I don't think I'll "honor" my ancestry with a credit card. However, if you have such an interest, you can find more information at: http://www.thescotsman.co.uk/scotland.cfm?id=564542003

To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter Discussion Board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Discussion Board."

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- OpenOffice.org 1.1 Beta2

I have written before about OpenOffice.org, a free office suite of programs that has most of the capabilities of Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc.). OpenOffice.org contains an excellent word processor, spreadsheet program, and presentation program (akin to PowerPoint), as well as a very good graphics drawing program that will produce everything from simple diagrams to dynamic 3D illustrations and special effects. OpenOffice.org is available for Windows, Solaris, and Linux operating systems. A Macintosh OS X version is in final beta. Of course, the best part is its price: OpenOffice.org is free.

You can read my past article about OpenOffice.org at: http://www.rootsforum.com/archives/news0218.htm. Another review of OpenOffice.org is available at: http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,3959,5398,00.asp

I am using OpenOffice.org more and more these days. It seems to have a cleaner design than Microsoft Word, the word processor I have been using for almost a decade. Also, OpenOffice.org's spellchecker, thesaurus, and hyphenator all seem to work better than Word's equivalents. I also find that OpenOffice.org creates better HTML files than those created by the latest version of Word. Opening a Word-created HTML document in a Web browser often results in "funny looking" documents. By contrast, OpenOffice.org creates documents that look like proper Web pages. Not bad for a free program!

This week the producers of OpenOffice.org announced a new beta test release. Version 1.1 Beta 2 now includes the following:

  • The ability to create PDF files (the same format as those created by Adobe Acrobat). This means that you can use this free program to create PDF files instead of paying $200+ for Acrobat. (Microsoft Word does not have this capability.)
  • Support for mailing a document as PDF
  • Support for exporting as a flat XML file
  • Support for Macromedia Flash (SWF) export
  • Support for mobile device formats like AportisDoc (Palm), Pocket Word, and Pocket Excel
  • Support for vertical writing within text documents, text frames, and graphic objects
  • Support for vertical writing in spreadsheet cells (the direction is individually selectable)
  • Support for using either Arabic or Hindi numerals
  • Enhanced footnote support
  • Macro Recorder
  • … and a lot more

You can find a complete list of the new features at http://www.openoffice.org/dev_docs/source/1.1beta2/features.html

Perhaps it is appropriate to list the features that OpenOffice.org does not have when comparing it to Microsoft's equivalent. To be sure, there are a few, but I find them to be features that I don't use. Here are a few:

Microsoft Word's Word Art can create fancy text, such as 3D letters and text that displays at an angle to the page, even text in an arc. Much of the same functionality exists in OpenOffice.org's graphics program; it can create many of the same effects, which can be imported into the word processor. However, Microsoft did the better job of integrating graphics into the word processor.

Creating subdocuments doesn't work as well in OpenOffice.org as in Word. (Subdocuments might be used when writing a book: one master document could be the "shell" for the entire book, and then separate subdocuments could be used for each chapter of the book.) OpenOffice.org does handle subdocuments, but style changes made to the master templates do not propagate to the subdocuments as easily as in Word.

Importing documents from Microsoft Office occasionally results in some minor formatting problems. For instance, the formatting from a table of contents in a Microsoft Word document will look a bit strange when imported into OpenOffice.org. However, I found it easy to reformat or else use OpenOffice.org to create a new Table of Contents with its own formatting.

All in all, I am pleased with OpenOffice.org and am now using the latest beta version a lot even though I purchased the latest version of Microsoft Office some time ago. You can download the free OpenOffice.org 1.1 beta 2 software at http://www.openoffice.org. Be warned that this is a whopping 60-megabyte file; users of dial-up connections may want to purchase CD-ROM disks or else use a download manager that can resume file transfers after possible aborts or time-outs.

If you prefer to purchase a CD-ROM version, you can buy them from a number of places, including from my Web pages at http://www.RootsForum.com/orders. My price for the CD-ROM diskis $5.00, and that includes shipment to anyplace in the U.S.

Keep in mind that this is beta software and may be buggy. After all, the entire purpose of a beta test is to find bugs. One has to assume that there are some bugs to be found! You might prefer to obtain the older, released version 1.0.3.1. It has proven to be very stable and nearly bug-free. You can obtain 1.0.3.1 from the same sources. A final release of version 1.1 is expected in about two months.

OpenOffice.org Version 1.1 Beta 2 requires:

  • Microsoft Windows 98, NT, ME, 2000 or XP (2000 or ME required for Asian/CJK versions)
  • 64 megabytes of RAM minimum or more
  • 250 megabytes of available hard disk space
  • 800-by-600 pixels of video resolution with 256 colors or more

These requirements are a bit less than the latest version of Microsoft Office. In fact, OpenOffice.org will perform faster than Microsoft Office on older PCs.

With this kind of competition, Microsoft may soon have to drop the price of its Office suite of programs to remain competitive.

To discuss this story further, please visit the newsletter Discussion Board at http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Discussion Board."

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- Home Pages Highlighted

The "Home Pages Highlighted" section consists of new genealogy-related home pages that you, the readers of this newsletter, nominate for publication in this newsletter. While anyone may nominate any genealogy-related home page, the process seems to work best when the webmaster for a home page nominates his or her own work. You are invited to enter your nomination online at http://www.rootsforum.com.

The following is a list of some of the genealogy-related World Wide Web home pages that have recently been listed by newsletter readers at http://www.rootsforum.com:

The Bhamidi Family - Genealogy, Member Directory and Family Information: http://www.bhamidi.com

Parish Register transcriptions for the Parish of Aldbourne in Wiltshire, England: http://www.treelines.co.uk/OPC/opcintro.html

The Family History Journal CD contains artistically designed, pre-formatted Microsoft Word template pages to easily organize, print and beautifully display your family’s story. Print one for each member of your family: http://www.mendedmemories.net

KINFOLK - Exploring the lineage and history of the Pioneer Bradys, as well as surnames of Thrash, Row, Henderson, Chrislip, Knaggs, Mathews, Squires, Wingfield, Lobban, Copeland, Lemmon & Umstot family lines: http://freepages.rootsweb.com/~bradytrilogy/kinfolk/

Walker/McKinney/Cain/Cryder family history - Diary of Myrtle Mckinney 1927-1936. Family Photos also featured. http://www.jim-walker.net

Martin Browne of Leeds, Yorks., Frederick Co., VA, Mason Co. Va and Madison Co., IN and his descendants. Cousins welcome: http://www.martinbrownefamily.org

Wilkins family, New England 1700's to present, updated regularly, headstones, wills, probate records, family tree: http://www.wilkinsfamily.org

The homepage for the Descendants of Dennis Springer and Ann Prickett is a means for researchers to come together and help prepare the Dennis Springer family book: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~rizer/Springer/index.htm

melungeons.com is dedicated to bringing you information about the Melungeon Movement. It began in 1997 at the First Union in Wise, Virginia when about one thousand people showed up at the College of Wise campus to reclaim their lost heritage. The "Melungeon Movement" is about racial and ethnic harmony. It took its name in honor of the original Melungeons who were ethnically diverse but came together as one people to survive and live in peace and harmony. The Melungeon Movement honors these early pioneers and they serve as a model for ethnic and racial relations: http://www.melungeons.com

Wigginton/Wiginton/Wiggington/Wigington family history with links to Gulick: http://members.aol.com/JanGulick

Investigating the French family of Sussex, NJ - 1775-1810: http://dickfrench.tripod.com

To submit your genealogy page to this newsletter, enter the necessary information at: http://www.rootsforum.com, click on "add your genealogy Web page to this list." Due to the volume of new Web pages submitted, I am not able to list all of them in the newsletter.

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The PR Budget for this newsletter is $0.00. I rely upon "word of mouse" advertising in which you recommend this newsletter to your friends. This newsletter is a private project of mine, and I have a zero budget for a publicity campaign to get more readers.

In each issue, I try to offer you useful, interesting and sometimes amusing information to help you with your genealogy efforts. Can you take a minute to help me out in return? If you think this newsletter is a worthwhile read, please tell your friends. Better yet, suggest they can read the Standard Edition or subscribe to the Plus Edition at http://www.RootsForum.com.

Thanks.


Are you interested in the articles in this newsletter? Would you like to learn more or ask questions or make comments about these articles? Join this newsletter’s online discussion group. Go to http://www.RootsForum.com and click on "Discussion Board."

You can also search past newsletters at the same address: http://www.RootsForum.com

If you would like to submit news, information or press releases for possible inclusion in future newsletters, send them to richard@eastman.net. The author does reserve the right to accept or reject any articles submitted.

COPYRIGHTS and Other Legal Things:

The contents of this newsletter are copyright by Richard W. Eastman with the following exception:

Many of the articles published in these newsletters contain quotes or references from others, especially from other Web sites, software user’s manuals, press releases and other public announcements. Any words in this newsletter attributed to another person or organization remain the copyrighted materials of the original author(s).

This document is provided for informational purposes only. The information contained in this document represents the views of Richard W. Eastman with one exception: words written by other authors and republished herein are the views solely of those authors. All information provided in this document is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind, either express or implied. The reader assumes the entire risk as to the accuracy and the use of this document.

You are hereby granted rights, unless otherwise specified, to re-distribute articles from this newsletter to other parties provided:

    1. You do so strictly for non-commercial purposes
    2. Articles marked with a Plus Sign (+) are not to be redistributed. Those articles are solely for the use of Plus Edition subscribers.
    3. You may not republish any articles containing words attributed to another person or organization until you obtain permission from that person or organization. While you do have permission to republish words written by Richard W. Eastman, you do not have automatic authority to republish words written by others, even if their words appear in this newsletter.

Also, please include the following statement with any articles you re-distribute:

The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2003 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.RootsForum.com.

Anyone complying with the above does not need to ask permission in advance.

Permission to use the words in this document for commercial purposes usually is granted. However, commercial use requires advance authorization.

Thank you for your cooperation.

ABOUT SPAM FILTERS:

Be aware that the biggest problem faced when sending e-mail newsletters is spam filters in e-mail servers. Although the problem plagues many, many newsletters and other types of perfectly legitimate email, this newsletter seems to be particularly susceptible. It is quite long, and contains numerous examples of the kinds of things that spam blacklists, in their infinite wisdom, have deemed to be "spam like." Therefore, numerous email servers will delete this newsletter under the assumption that it is spam.

If you all of a sudden stop receiving your copy of the newsletter (and this happens more than you might think), don't just assume I skipped an issue or there's something wrong with the newsletter's distribution. I rarely skip an issue without noting that in advance. If you stop receiving the newsletter, chances are that it's not a problem with your subscription; it's a problem with your mail server or your spam filter. That is the number one cause of newsletter subscription problems.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Dick Eastman is a frequent presenter at major genealogy conferences. He has published articles in Genealogical Computing and Family Chronicle magazines and for a number of Web sites. He was an advisor to PBS' Ancestry series and appeared as a guest in one of the episodes. He serves on the Advisory Board of the New England Historic Genealogical Society and is a past Director of GENTECH and of the New England Computer Genealogists. Dick is the author of YOUR ROOTS: Total Genealogy Planning On Your Computer published by Ziff-Davis Press. He can be reached at: richard@eastman.net. Due to the volume of e-mail received, he is unable to answer every e-mail message received.

If you have questions or comments about the article in this newsletter, go to http://www.RootsForum.com and then click on "Discussion Board." Post your message there. You will receive then assistance from Dick Eastman or from a number of other people.

SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION:

To obtain a subscription to Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter – Plus Edition, go to http://www.RootsForum.com/plus

To receive a free e-mail notification whenever a new Standard Edition of the newsletter becomes available, go to http://www.rootsforum.com/mailman/listinfo/newsletter-standard_rootsforum.com.

This newsletter is available in both ASCII text and HTML versions. To change your subscription to the ASCII version, send an e-mail to ascii@roots.d2g.com. To change your subscription to the HTML version, send an e-mail to html@roots.d2g.com.

If you have any questions about your subscription, send a message to support@rootsforum.com.

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